Sunday, February 19, 2017

I Celebrate Black History Month


I celebrate Black History month not just in February, but all year around. We honor and celebrate the usual men and women noted in our history.  Meanwhile, Black history has evolved over the years because the accomplishments and historical events continue to build up our Black American History. 

The men and women who are apart of our Black History are truly inspiring and empowering.  They give you hope for your dreams and life goals.  They didn't just open doors for African American children or adults, but their journey and story allowed many of us to celebrate their accomplishments. 

For instance, the new faces in the picture collage below is our 44th President Barack Obama and First Lady Michelle Obama with mogul icon Oprah Winfrey.  Our children and grandchildren will get to read about them in addition to the great historical men and women in the portrait.  The sacrifices the men and women in this picture have made so that we may even have the knowledge and ability to believe in ourselves is an honor.  I salute the men and women of the past, present, and will continue to honor those to come in the future. 


Look at the powerful couple that served this country for eight years.  They reminded us of the power of a strong black couple and education is key to the success of your journey. 
Photo Credits:  People Magazine

In honor of Black History tradition, here are some historic facts that we all should add to our history notes. I found a website called Black Americans Black History and it's loaded with 390 years of factual about the men and women at http://blackamericans.com/black-history/black-history

A Few Black History Facts from Black American History.  Did You know about Robert Smalls?
 
Robert Smalls (1839-1916) was a black American statesman who was born a slave and made a daring escape at the beginning of the Civil War. After the war he served five terms in Congress as the representative from South Carolina.















Lorraine Hansberry is best known for writing A Raisin in the Sun, the first play by an African American woman produced on Broadway.










Great article with Historical Fact from
http://history1900s.about.com/od/people/tp/famousafricanamericans.htm

Is there a Black American who has given you hope that has inspired you to follow your dreams and aspirations?  For me, Oprah Winfrey and Michelle Obama have both empowered and inspired me to follow my dreams. 

However, they have given me that beautiful vision to see a brown skinned woman like myself doing greatness and being empowering to other women.  They both have taught me to accept the skin and body that I am in.  These women have inspired me to follow my passion and walk into my purpose despite any barrier that may come before me.  The barrier can be broken and it's no longer seen as impossible but as possible. 

Photo source: Flickr

It's time that we capture our history and the role we have played and continue to be apart of to shape the American History through the eyes of Black History.  Our ancestors can smile for the journey is not over as we still have work, but we will never go back to where we once was in history.  We stand up and we rise up. 




#BlackHistoryMonth
#RiseUp
#BeautifulBlackWomen